Applications and Health Benefits of CBC (Cannabichromene)

What is CBC?

Cannabichromene, also known as CBC, is one of many active components in the cannabis plant called cannabinoids. CBC is non-intoxicating and is used for many health benefits, which will be discussed later. This cannabinoid can be consumed in many ways and we will go over some options for consumption. CBC is closely related to CBD, so let's first talk about that relationship. 

How are CBC and CBD related?

There are six major cannabinoids in hemp; CBC and CBD (cannabidiol) are two of them. Both of these chemicals originate from the same parent cannabinoid, CBG (cannabigerol). CBD and CBC in hemp products work together with all the cannabinoids to create what is referred to as an “entourage effect”. This means that they all work together to create the best impact.

While CBC is one of the major cannabinoids, it occurs in much smaller quantities compared to CBD. In a full spectrum or “full plant” product, you may only be getting a trace of CBC in it. With that being said, there are products available that concentrate the amount of CBC in order to get the most out of that cannabinoid.

What are the benefits of CBC?

CBC has the potential to treat many different ailments. It can help with mood issues, pain, and is a neuroprotectant. Research has shown that CBC may be particularly helpful for: 

  • Acne. CBC is able to fight acne thanks to its anti-inflammatory properties and ability to slow the production of lipids by the sebaceous glands.
  • Depression. CBC has antidepressant properties when working with cannabinoids THC and CBD thanks to the entourage effect. In one study on mice, CBC had antidepressant effects on the animals.
  • Pain and Inflammation. Just like CBD, CBC helps to block pain and decrease inflammation. CBC has fewer side-effects compared to NSAIDS. The potency of CBCs effects for pain and inflammation increases when used in conjunction with THC.
  • Cancer. CBC may be able to help with fighting cancer.
    •  CBC is able to increase the levels of anandamide, a cannabinoid made in the body. Anandamide is able to fight breast cancer. Additionally, CBC and other cannabinoids are able to slow the growth of cancer cells.
  • Brain function. CBC helps cells necessary for homeostasis in the brain.
    •  In an in vitro study of mouse brain cells, CBC had a positive impact.  The cells studied were neural stem progenitor cells (NSPCs) which are needed for brain function.

Choosing a CBC product

Like any hemp-derived cannabinoid, there are many different ways to use CBC. It can be eaten, smoked, applied to the skin, and used as a tincture. Every person will have preferences for the type of product they choose depending on what they are looking to treat, their lifestyle and preferences. 

Smoking has the fastest onset of any method but doesn’t last as long. Edibles are the slowest to absorb but last longer in the body. Tinctures that drop under the tongue fall in the middle and are great for easy dosing. Here are the CBC products we have available at Happy Trails:

  • Nuleaf Naturals CBC, these are capsules containing 15mg each. Capsules are convenient and have a high absorption in the body.
  • Extract Labs Sauce, a high CBC concentrate made for smoking. With 600mg CBC and 300mg CBD, smoking this extract will have a fast onset but you will need a device to use it with. Read the Happy Trails information on vaping here.

CBC can make a great addition to your routine, with other cannabinoids or even on its own. It does appear that CBC works best when other cannabinoids are present versus when the CBC is isolated. There are many ways to mix and match different products to best suit your treatment needs. Read more about them on our website or stop in the store to ask questions, we are here to help.

 

 
Amber
 
My name is Amber. I am a cannabinoid consultant and columnist for Happy Trails. I have a Bachelor of Science in Biology. I enjoy learning about things I have passion for, and my family lovingly calls me a “human encyclopedia”.  Read more about Amber here.  

 

References

Cooke, J. (2022, January 6). What is CBC (Cannabichromene)? What Are The Benefits? Daily CBD. Retrieved February 17, 2022, from https://dailycbd.com/en/cbc/

El-Alfy, A. T., Ivey, K., Robinson, K., Ahmed, S., Radwan, M., Slade, D., Khan, I., ElSohly, M., & Ross, S. (2010). Antidepressant-like effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis sativa L. Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, 95(4), 434–442. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2010.03.004

Havelka, J. (2017, December 6). What Is CBC and What Are the Benefits of This Cannabinoid? Leafly. Retrieved February 17, 2022, from https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis-101/what-is-cannabichromene-cbc-cannabinoid

Olah, A., Markovics, A., Szabo-Papp, J., Timea Szabo, P., Stott, C., Zouboulis, C. C., & Biro, T. (2016, April 20). Differential effectiveness of selected non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids on human sebocyte functions implicates their introduction in dry/seborrhoeic skin and acne treatment. Experimental Dermatology, 25(9), 701-707. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/exd.13042

Shinjyo, N., & Di Marzo, V. (2013, November). The effect of cannabichromene on adult neural stem/progenitor cells. Neurochemistry International, 63(5), 432-437. Science Direct. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuint.2013.08.002

El-Alfy, A. T., Ivey, K., Robinson, K., Ahmed, S., Radwan, M., Slade, D., Khan, I., ElSohly, M., & Ross, S. (2010). Antidepressant-like effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis sativa L. Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior, 95(4), 434–442. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2010.03.004

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